Week 4 – Blog Tour 1

This week’s blog posts will include a tour of two of my classmates’ blogs. I will be explaining their blog as well telling you about some of the content within their blog. I will be starting this week off with reviewing my classmate Ian’s blog which is named Sneakerworld.

At first glance, the Sneakerworld blog is very clean and professional. It is very clear as to where everything is located and the overall look of the page is very clean and uncluttered. I really appreciate the fact that his main page for his blog has pictures along with the title as I feel it really brings it attention.

After observing the overall blog you can quickly tell what his topic is as well as what his subtopics are. His overall topic is obviously sneakers but he breaks it down into categories each being a different post. Some of the topics are the ‘Most Expensive Sneakers”, “Most Popular Sneakers”, and “Most Innovative”. While looking through all of the different blogs that he has posted you can clearly tell that he had put a lot of effort and thought into making each one of these categories. A majority of his different posts are taking only a few different sneakers out of the entire population.

After analyzing his topic and subtopics I then went inside of his posts to see what he was really talking about. The first post that I had interest in was titled “Most Expensive Sneakers”. I wouldn’t call myself a sneakerhead but I do hear about some of the hype behind some shoes and the Sneakerworld blog doesn’t short out on any of it. I clicked on this blog because I saw the picture of the Nike Air Mags and I knew they were rare and expensive, but I didn’t know how rare or expensive. I started to skim this blog in order to gain a slight understanding of what it was about, but I found myself thoroughly reading and clicking on his links. I feel as though he brings forth everything that a reader wants to hear. He tells you all the facts and then some. He clearly has a level of passion for this topic as you can seemingly feel the energy through his post.

Overall I really enjoyed Ian’s blog Sneakerworld. I came in with some knowledge of the sneaker world and the market of sneakers and I left with much more information than I came in with. Ian created his blog in a way that was very professional. He made choices in the design of his blog that made it very clean, easy to follow, as well as enticing. Alongside the overall look of his blog, the content was interesting. He wrote in ways that are uncommon for normal writers and he made the blog fun and exciting. I went from skimming through his blog to reading his blog purely because it was enjoyable to learn from him.

Here is a Link to Ian’s blog “Sneakerworld”: https://snkrwrld1.wordpress.com/contact

 

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Week 3 – Muscle Strains

In this post, I will be talking about what you can do to prevent muscle strains and what I did to prevent myself from restraining my shoulder. I will also talk about certain exercises and precautions you can do to prevent unwanted strains.

How to Prevent Muscle Strains

Preventing a muscle strain is unlike the other injuries I have talked about in my past blogs. A muscle strain can happen at any time while you are physically doing something. This makes it very hard to predict and prevent. Like I wrote in my previous blog muscle strains often times will happen when a muscle is being overloaded or when it is severely fatigued although they can happen when you least expect it. Some of the best ways you can prevent muscle strains are very simple. the number one way that I help prevent myself from strains is proper stretching. It is very important that if you are going to do anything physical you need to have a proper stretch or your muscles will not be prepared to go the distance and they will end up tearing or straining. Another way that you can prevent muscle strains is practicing like you perform. This is a saying that many coaches use but often times mean differently. What I mean by this is if you are going to run a marathon you shouldn’t be doing forty-yard dashes as practices. You need to prepare your body for what’s to come by doing exercises that will simulate the action you are going to complete. this can take some time. You need to put in the time practicing otherwise you still have the potential for injury. The third way that you can prevent muscle strains is fairly simple drink plenty of water, eat proper food, and get an adequate amount of rest. I know my high school coaches drilled us on this and many people didn’t listen but your body can only perform as well as you treat it. If you neglect your body it will perform poorly.

What I do to Prevent Muscle Strains

I do many things to help myself stay strain free. Like I had written in my previous blog. I spend a good amount of time stretching and preparing myself before practice. I also spend time after practice icing the sore spots and hydrating in order to let my body have the time to fully recover. During the on season, it is essential for me to get adequate sleep. If I’m going into practice or a game and I haven’t given my body enough rest it is very clear to me that my body is underperforming. Just like sleep I make sure that I am drinking more than enough water as well as giving myself all the nutrition my body needs to stay fueled. One of the final things that I will sometimes use to help prevent myself from muscle strains is by wearing compressive material. Wearing compressions helps keep the muscle group tight and orderly and doesn’t allow for it to have room to move in the wrong directions.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

https://physioworks.com.au/Injuries-Conditions/Regions/muscle-pain-injury-strain-tear-pulled-muscle

Week 3 – Muscle Strains

The Medical Analysis of a Muscle Strain

In this blog post, I will help teach you how professionals decide whether you have a muscle strain or a different injury. I will also teach you some of the ways you can recover from a muscle strain as well as some of the ways that I had recovered from my muscle strains.

Starting off with how to diagnose a muscle strain. For somebody who has little experience with anatomy or sports medicine, it can be very hard to figure out what exactly is wrong, although it is very clear that it hurts and where it hurts. There are a few different injuries that could seem very similar to a muscle strain. These injuries are bone fractures, torn ligaments, and bone bruising. all of these injuries are fairly similar as they all show most of the same symptoms, bruising, pain in the inflicted area, and sometimes impaired movement. There are many tests you can do to test for these other injuries but, what can you do to tell if you have a muscle strain. One of the best ways to tell if you have a muscle strain and not another injury is figuring out how it happened. Muscle strains often times will happen when the muscle is being overloaded or is very fatigued. In my case, I had film from our games and practices to go back and look at but others may have to rely on memory. If your injury had happened due to an unusual movement or from an impact you may want to steer away from a muscle strain as that isn’t likely what you are dealing with. Another way that you can tell if its a muscle strain or separate injury is to have an Xray or better yet an MRI. although those are last resorts due to the expense and radiation.

Recovery From a Muscle Strain

My recovery was slightly different from a normal recovery as I didn’t want to sit out from my final games of the season. I wouldn’t follow in my footsteps and If I were to go back I would likely sit out until I am completely recovered. Recovery from a muscle strains was very similar to my knee injuries as they both began to feel good and I felt like I had regained my strength although they were not fully healed. The recovery process I went through for my shoulder went a little bit like this. I would start my practices with mobility stretches. I would slowly stretch my shoulder out from every angle and then I would begin to really work it. I babied it a little bit and what I mean by that is I was careful with it I made sure that I wouldn’t be letting it get hurt again. after practice, I would ice it for 15 minutes then stretch for 10 minutes and I would do this rotation for about an hour. It took many weeks before I made a full recovery and I did reaggravate it several times which is basically resetting the clock.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

https://physioworks.com.au/Injuries-Conditions/Regions/muscle-pain-injury-strain-tear-pulled-muscle

Week 3 – Muscle Strains

Muscle strains are bound to happen to almost all athletes. It is just part of being in athletics. In this post, I will tell you about one of my more major strains. If you’ve kept up with my blog you’ll know by know that most of my injuries occur during football. Well, this one did too. It was my sophomore year and I had some playtime on varsity. It was very intimidating as many of the other team’s players were much larger than me. But back to the story of the injury. It had happened in the middle of a game. I can’t recall which game it was or when it happened in the game but I do remember playing through the game even though I wasn’t able to raise my right arm. I remember having a feeling that was very similar to a dead arm and a cramp combined but I never got hit so it was a very strange feeling. I had gone home that night and iced my shoulder not really knowing what to expect in the morning. It was a Friday night when I had hurt my shoulder, this meant I either had to go into the emergency room or wait it out until Monday to have it checked out by the trainer. Of course, my mother pushed for the emergency room like she does with every bump or bruise but I had refused and waited until Monday. Sunday night when I had woken up and went to shower I noticed had noticed a new very large bruise (when I say large I mean it covered my entire shoulder). I began gaining back the strength to lift it but it was still pretty painful. The next day on Monday the bruise was already starting to fade but I ended up going to the trainer regardless. My trainer immediately did the little tests that she does with every injury to test your range of motion and where the pain is located. I remember some of these motions being painful but it was one of those good pains where it stretched it out a little bit. She had told me that I had a muscle strain on my lateral deltoid (aka the big part of your shoulder.)  She told me it wasn’t anything too serious as I was still able to move around for the most part but it could be re-aggravated fairly easily. Like I do most of the time, I went against her advice to stay for a few weeks and went back out to practice. Eventually, after a few weeks of icy hot and ice baths, I did make a full recovery and regained all mobility and strength. Throughout my athletic career, I have had numerous minor strains, like most athletes. Even for the most minor strains I would suggest at least having your trainer look at it to make sure you aren’t going to cause yourself any permanent damage. As far as the major strains I would 100% recommend sitting out and making a full recovery before returning to athletics.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

https://physioworks.com.au/Injuries-Conditions/Regions/muscle-pain-injury-strain-tear-pulled-muscle

Week 2 – My First Knee Injury

Recovery and Prevention

In this post, I will break down each of the different aspects within my injury and talk about how to recover and how to prevent each one specifically. I will be using my own knowledge along with stopsportsinjuries.com. I will section off each individual Injury in this order. ACL, MCL, meniscus, and then the femur and the tibia will be put together.

ACL

The ACL is a fairly easy injury to recover from the hardest part of it personally was the time that it takes to recover. I didn’t require surgery but if I were to have completely torn my ACL it would’ve taken six to nine months to heal from. The surgery is called ACL reconstruction. This surgery consists of taking a graph from either you or a donor and reconnecting the remaining ends of the ligament. It is a fairly easy surgery but it will commonly leave you with a decent sized scar. Preventing an ACL injury is hard to do and there is no for sure way to stop from tearing your ACL. In my case, I had many weeks of strength exercises in order to increase my knee stability. I also was given a knee brace that would also help stabilize. They had also told me because I didn’t have surgery that I may retear my ACL.

MCL

The MCL is one of the few tears that only requires surgery in rare cases. An MCL tear only requires four to eight weeks to heal from although if there is inflammation from other injuries it can take longer. In my case, I had a good amount of inflammation within my knee and that could’ve had an impact on the healing process. An MCL tear has a very similar process to an ACL tear as far as post surgery and prevention. It will take many hours of physical therapy to regain strength and mobility. Doing these exercises will also help decrease your chances of retearing your MCL. A brace is often used during the recovery process to help keep the MCL stabile while it is healing.

Meniscus

The meniscus has two different layers. One layer can be torn and healed while the other layer, once it is torn, will need to be surgically repaired. I was fortunate enough to have torn the portion that heals on its own. If the surgery is required it will take around six weeks without bearing weight to recover from. Besides staying off of your legs the process of recovery just takes time. There is ultimately no way to stop a meniscus tear from happening besides taken proper precautions and being careful.

Bone Fractures

Bone fractures have many different methods of recovery all because of the different types of fractures. The time of healing depends on the severity, type, and location of the injury. I was once again very fortunate to have microfractures that only required me to stay off of it for about three months. Due to not being able to use the limb, it lost strength and part of the recovery process was rebuilding the lost strength and coordination.

 

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

Week 2 – My First Knee Injury

The medical Analysis of My Knee Injury

My first Knee Injury, as you’ve read previously, was composed of a few different injuries. I had a partial tear of my ACL, MCL, and meniscus. I also had multiple microfractures within my femur and tibia. Some of the information found within this blog post will be taken from StopSportsInjuries.com. First I will explain what these components are. Starting with the ACL, the ACL is an acronym for anterior cruciate ligament. It is a ligament that is found within your knee. It connects your tibia and your femur and helps keep your knee stable and straight. The second ligament is the MCL, the MCL connects starts at the end of your femur and runs a few inches down the front of your tibia. its main purpose is to prevent your knee from hyperextending. The next part is the meniscus. The meniscus is a piece of cartilage that helps cushion your tibia and femur. The femur is the largest bone in the human body which is found inside your thigh. The tibia is the front bone found inside of your lower leg. How do you hurt each one of these individually? The ACL can be torn by a sudden change in direction along with having your knee locked out. It is common to hear and feel a loud pop along with swelling and pain. The MCL is commonly torn by an impact to the outside of the knee. It will feel similar to an ACL tear. It is very common for you to tear your ACL if you tear your MCL. The meniscus is torn when you have a bend in the knee and a planted foot and twist your knee. It is common for older people to have meniscus tears as the meniscus becomes weaker with age. Fractures within the tibia and femur will often happen from a forceful impact or a compression of the knee joint. After hearing this information you can start to understand how my injury happened. The ACL was most likely torn alongside my MCL. It happened from the sudden change of direction while I had my planted leg locked out. The meniscus was most likely torn slightly after the MCL and ACL as I was beginning to drop. The femoral and tibial fractures were from the brute force and compression that was caused by the lockout. With this whole list of tears and fractures, it seems like nothing else could’ve gone wrong but a majority of these injuries were a step down from what they could’ve been. My MCL and ACL were grade two tears meaning they were only partially torn. They could have been completely torn and required a major surgery. The meniscus tear was also only a partial tear and the cartilage could’ve been completely torn. The microfractures in my tibia and femur were very small scale. They could’ve broken completely or even worse they could’ve broken through a growth plate which potentially could’ve required surgery on both knees.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

 

Week 2 – My First Knee Injury

My first knee injury happened my junior year in high school. We were playing at Lake City and the weather was dreadful. There was a major rainstorm throughout a majority of the day and night which caused the field to be very muddy. Any outdoor athlete knows that playing in mud can be fun and hard. Wearing cleats was just like wearing suction cups on your feet. As we were warming up on the field it was becoming more and more torn up. (this is where the story gets interesting) We were about 15 plays into the game and I knew it was going to be a run-heavy game as the weather wouldn’t allow for many passes. We were stacking the box anticipating the run and I had gotten down blocked and at the same time, I had turned my back to that player. This meant he was pushing me from behind. I had planted my right leg in order to turn out of the block and get back to the play but the second I planted my leg I had instant pain. I had locked my leg out and down into the mud. I had immediate pain. I dropped down and Instantly knew something was wrong. This is the best way that I can describe the pain. Imagine taking a red-hot railroad nail and pounding it into your knee. Brutal? Trust me in know. I was obviously taken out for the rest of the game but continued to sit alongside my teammates and cheer them on. I ended up going home after the game and waiting until the next morning to go to the sports medicine clinic but the entire night it felt as though it had just happened. I had walked into the sports medicine clinic and they had done numerous tests to look for torn ligaments and I couldn’t relax enough for any of them as they were all very painful. I had almost no swelling in my knee which confused the doctor because typically you will have a good amount of swelling from a ligament tear or a bone break. I then went in for an MRI and Xray. As soon as the Xray came back they had told me that nothing was broken but I would still need the MRI. I then went in for the MRI and after I was done they immediately told me that I had some microfractures withing my tibia plateau. This is like the little ball on the end of your bone. They also told me that I had a lot of interior swelling inside of my knee which could be from a variety of different things. I had then gotten a set of crutches (which I absolutely hated and only used for about three days) and set up my next appointment where they would tell me the final diagnostic. At that appointment, they had told me that I had a few microfractures as well as a partially torn ACL, MCL, and meniscus. This would be the ending to my junior year football season.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

Week 1 – Bone Bruises

Short Week

Due to the shorter week, and because of the topic being a little shorter than the rest I will be combining the recovery and the prevention into one post. I will start this post by explaining how I recovered from my injury and I will also talk about other processes that are suggested by professionals. After talking about my recovery I will then talk about what I currently do to keep it from happening again. I will also use some professional help in explaining prevention of bone bruises.

Recovery From a Bone Bruise

After I had forfeited out of my tournament I took the weekend off in order to let the swelling go down so that I could have my athletic trainer at my high school look at it. Right away it was hard to tell what it was because there was very little pain from walking on it. We did a series of different test to look for ligament tears and all of them ended up fine until we had a test that had me kneel on the ground. This felt like I kneeled on a nail. It was very painful. She then made an appointment for me to go in and have an MRI and Xray taken. The Xray came back with nothing broken and the MRI came back with lots of swelling and a grade one tear on my patellar tendon (but that’s for another blog). Although the tendon tear was painful from kneeling and while moving my patella. by the time it should have been healed it was still causing a very sharp pain when I kneeled. I was then diagnosed with a bone bruise on my upper tibia. This was caused by the hard impact with the mat. The trainer had told me it would be about 4-8 weeks until I would be pain-free. Although I did begin to be pain-free in about 2 weeks I was told that if I went back to early I was at high risk of reinjuring myself and starting the process over again. For the next 6 weeks, I spent my time after school rolling out, icing, wearing compression sleeves, and taking anti-inflammatory medication. This was brutal as all I wanted to do was be back on the mat.

Prevention

After going through the six weeks of what seemed like hell I decided to take every precaution possible. I had talked to my trainer as well as the physicians and the Mayo Clinic and they had a few different suggestions. The most obvious suggestion that they had for me was to quit contact sports and that was ruled out immediately. The second suggestion they had was wearing knee pads that would help cushion the impact. That was the easiest option for me to choose. They had offered me a few different knee pads at the Mayo Clinic but I had some friends who wore knee pads as well so I asked them where they got theirs. They had told me they used volleyball knee pads and that exactly what I went out and got. Overall for injury prevention with bone bruises, it is very limited to what you can do. The two biggest things you can do are one not do it and two use proper safety equipment which in my case was wearing knee pads.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

Week 1 – Bone Bruises

Slight Adjustments

Unfortunately, I am going a little bit off track from my first post. This week I will only be posting two blogs as I have already posted a blog about what I plan to do for the next five weeks. Therefore I have made slight adjustments and by the title of the blog, you can tell I will be talking about bone bruises. I will also be moving the story about my knee injury to next week.

What Are Bone Bruises?

First I want to start you off with an explanation of what bone bruising is and how it happens. The definition that I got from The University of Rochester Medical Center was “A bone bruise is a traumatic injury to a bone that is less severe than a bone fracture. You might think of a black and blue mark on your skin when you hear the word bruise, but bruises can also happen in muscle and bone. This happens when an injury damages small blood vessels and causes blood and fluid to leak into the nearby tissues and blood vessels.”. If you didn’t understand the complex term here’s a simplified one. A bone bruise happens from an impact whether its object to bone or bone on bone damages the blood vessels leaving it swollen and or bruised.

My Story with Bone Bruises

Throughout my athletic career, I have had two bone bruises one being on the bottom of my tibia (ankle) and one on the top of my tibia (knee). Both of my bone bruises happened in contact sports. The first one I will be talking about was the bone bruise on my upper tibia. This injury happened in my second year of high school wrestling while I was a sophomore. The injury happened while I was at a varsity tournament in Maple Grove, Minnesota. This was our opening tournament for the year. I was wrestling the weight class above mine for this tournament as the varsity team needed somebody to fill in. Therefore I was at the time weighing roughly 220lbs wrestling what seemed to be fully grown men, all weighing above 270lbs. Back to the point of the story. It happened on the first match of the day. I don’t remember the exact time it happened but I do remember what I did to make it happen. I had taken a shot on my guy (basically lunging at there legs) and banged my knee off the ground. This caused some great discomfort but I decided to finish out the tournament which was a big mistake. Throughout the rest of the day I wrestled about five other matches and every one the pain continued to grow and I started to avoid going down with that knee but the inevitable happened and I finally had to stop for the day. I had to forfeit out the rest of the tournament. Although it was very hard to do so it would’ve been smarter to stop when it first happened as I ended up sitting out almost the entire season waiting for it to heal. Which leads me to my next post which will be about preventing bone bruises as well as healing from them.

All of the information, besides my own stories, can be found at

https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

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